Climate Newsprint

[Letter] Mining undermining Brazil's environment

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Authors: Hani Rocha El Bizri, Jonathan Christopher Bausch Macedo, Adriano Pereira Paglia, Thaís Queiroz Morcatty
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Letter] Brazil's Amazon conservation in peril

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Authors: Rafael M. Almeida, Thomas E. Lovejoy, Fábio Roland
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Letter] Brazil's Amazonian fish at risk by decree

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Authors: R. M. Tófoli, G. H. Z. Alves, R. M. Dias, L. C. Gomes
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Technical Comment] Comment on “Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply”

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Olive et al. (Reports, 16 October 2015, p. 310) and Goff (Technical Comment, 4 September 2015, p. 1065) raise important concerns with respect to recent findings of Milankovitch cycles in seafloor bathymetry. However, their results inherently support that the Southern East Pacific Rise is the optimum place to look for such signals and, in fact, models match those observations quite closely. Author: Maya Tolstoy
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Technical Response] Response to Comment on “Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply”

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Tolstoy reports the existence of a characteristic 100 thousand year (ky) period in the bathymetry of fast-spreading seafloor but does not argue that sea level change is a first-order control on seafloor morphology worldwide. Upon evaluating the overlap between tectonic and Milankovitch periodicities across spreading rates, we reemphasize that fast-spreading ridges are the best potential recorders of a sea level signature in seafloor bathymetry. Authors: J.-A. Olive, M. D. Behn, G. Ito, W. R. Buck, J. Escartín, S. Howell
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Introduction to Special Issue] Nature's Fury

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Authors: Brent Grocholski, Robert Coontz
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Special Issue News] Thinking the Unthinkable

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
What are the greatest threats to humanity and human civilization? Scholars think a self-induced catastrophe such as nuclear war or a bioengineered pandemic is most likely to do us in. But extreme natural hazards—including threats from space and geologic upheavals here on Earth—could also do the job. Although common, moderately severe disasters such as earthquakes attract far more funding and attention than low-probability apocalyptic ones, a handful of researchers persists in thinking the unthinkable. With knowledge and planning, they say, it's possible to prepare for—or in some cases prevent—rare but devastating natural disasters such as blasts of particles from the sun, collisions with near-Earth asteroids like the one that wiped out the dinosaurs, and supervolcanoes that dwarf any eruptions in recorded history. Author: Julia Rosen
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Special Issue News] Doomsday Machines

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
In San Diego, California, a six-story tower riddled with strain gauges and accelerometers rises from the platform of one of the world's biggest earthquake machines. This device—a sort of bull ride for buildings—is one in a network built around the United States to advance natural disaster science with more realistic and sophisticated tests. The National Science Foundation initiative has helped scientists simulate some of the most powerful and destructive forces on Earth, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and landslides. The work has led to new building standards and better ways to build or retrofit everything from wharves to older concrete buildings. Now, in a new $62 million, 5-year program, the network of doomsday machines is expanding to simulate hurricanes and tornadoes and is joining forces with computer modeling to study how things too big for a physical test—such as nuclear reactors or even an entire city—will weather what Mother Nature throws at them. Author: Warren Cornwall
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Special Issue Review] Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas–driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities. Authors: Adam H. Sobel, Suzana J. Camargo, Timothy M. Hall, Chia-Ying Lee, Michael K. Tippett, Allison A. Wing
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Special Issue Review] Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective. Authors: Stefan Voigt, Fabio Giulio-Tonolo, Josh Lyons, Jan Kučera, Brenda Jones, Tobias Schneiderhan, Gabriel Platzeck, Kazuya Kaku, Manzul Kumar Hazarika, Lorant Czaran, Suju Li, Wendi Pedersen, Godstime Kadiri James, Catherine Proy, Denis Macharia Muthike, Jerome Bequignon, Debarati Guha-Sapir
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[Special Issue Review] Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes. Authors: Kazushige Obara, Aitaro Kato
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] Driven to collapse

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: Brent Grocholski
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] Making the forbidden allowed

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: Ian S. Osborne
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] The innate wisdom of ducklings

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: Sacha Vignieri
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] Adaptors conduct the EGFR symphony

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: Leslie K. Ferrarelli
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] The heat is on

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: H. Jesse Smith
Categories: Climate Newsprint

[This Week in Science] Carbon nanotubes boost battery storage

Science Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:00
Author: Zakya H. Kafafi
Categories: Climate Newsprint
Bookmark and Share
Support Not Stupid  |  Contact Us  |  Not Stupid 2009